Liszt: Prometheus; Mephisto Waltz No. 1; Mazeppa; Hamlet. Wagner: Siegfried Idyll
Karl Münchinger
Label
Decca
Catalogue No.
4828427
Barcode
00028948284276
Format
1-CD
About
TRACK LISTING / ARTISTS

FRANZ LISZT (1811–1886)
1 Prometheus, symphonic poem No. 5, S.99
2 Mephisto Waltz No. 1, S.110 No. 2
3 Mazeppa, symphonic poem No. 6, S. 100
4 Hamlet, symphonic poem No. 10, S.104

Paris Conservatoire Orchestra
Karl Münchinger

RICHARD WAGNER (1813–1883)
5 Siegfried Idyll

Members of L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
Stuttgarter Kammerorchester
Karl Münchinger

FIRST CD RELEASE / FIRST INTERNATIONAL CD RELEASE

Track previews
Hamlet, Symphonic Poem No. 10, S. 104
Siegfried Idyll
Prometheus, Symphonic Poem No. 5, S. 99
Mephisto Waltz No. 1, S. 110 No. 2 "The Dance in the Village Inn" (after Lenau)
Mazeppa, Symphonic Poem No. 6, S. 100
Recording information

Recording Producers: James Walker (Prometheus, Mephisto Waltz); Victor Olof (Mazeppa, Hamlet, Siegfried Idyll)
Balance Engineers: Kenneth Wilkinson, James Brown (Mazeppa, Hamlet); Gil Went (Siegfried Idyll)
Recording Locations: Victoria Hall, Geneva, Switzerland, October 1951 (Siegfried Idyll); La Maison de la Mutualité, Paris, France, 8–11 June (Prometheus, Mephisto Waltz); 27–28 September 1954 (Mazeppa, Hamlet)
Remastering Engineer: Chris Bernauer
Original Decca LP Releases: LW 5136 (Liszt: Prometheus, Mephisto Waltz No. 1): first issued October 1954; LXT 5142 (Liszt: Prometheus, Mephisto Waltz No. 1, Mazeppa, Hamlet); LXT 2669 (Wagner)
Cover Image: Illustrations from the LP cover for Decca LXT 5142, commissioned by Decca and representing Mephistopheles and Mazeppa (artist unidentified).

Reviews

‘I have never heard a better recording than this one by the Stuttgart Orchestra… the greatest care and attention is lavished on the music and there is a classical poise and perfection in this interpretation which makes it a very desirable acquisition.’ Irish Monthly, July 1952 (Siegfried Idyll)

‘Fine performances here; and while it may be that Liszt is a little out of date in these works, they continue to exert a rather ghoulish fascination. Liszt was always so Lisztian!’ Gramophone, June 1956

‘[Mazeppa and Hamlet] match in drama and clarity their two companions, adding up to a quartet of fine Liszt interpretations.’ High Fidelity, July 1956