Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade; Le Coq d’or; Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5


Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade; Le Coq d’or; Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5
Lorin Maazel
Label
Decca
Catalogue No.
4806627
Barcode
00028948066278
Format
2-CD
About
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CD1
NICOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV
Scheherazade, Op. 35
Le Coq d’or – Suite

CD2
Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36
Capriccio espagnol, Op. 34

SERGEI PROKOFIEV 
Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, Op. 100

The Cleveland Orchestra
Lorin Maazel

Recording information

Recording Producer: James Mallinson
Balance Engineers: Colin Moorfoot, Michael Mailes (Scheherazade, Prokofiev); Colin Moorfoot, Martin Atkinson (Le Coq d’or, Russian Easter Festival Overture, Capriccio espagnol)
Recording Location: Masonic Auditorium, Cleveland, USA, 3 October 1977 (Scheherazade), 10 October 1977 (Prokofiev), 19, 22 & 29 October 1979 (Russian Easter Festival Overture, Capriccio espagnol, Le Coq d’or)

Reviews

‘scintillating playing from the Cleveland Orchestra’ (Scheherazade) Gramophone

‘Maazel conveys great affection for the composer … one can certainly revel with him in Rimsky’s delicious orchestral palette … the ear takes pleasure in the glitter and impact of the sound (Capriccio espagnol) … the interpretation works splendidly … the Allegros have an exhilarating ebullience and thrust, while the Decca sound creates a sonorous panoply of brass against a percussive backing that is stunningly effective (Russian Easter Festival Overture) … the suite from The Golden Cockerel is again given demonstration sound quality … marvellously atmospheric playing with translucent strings and glowing woodwind … the finale makes a superb climax with the brass rasping gloriously and the frenzied woodwind squeals to add to the excitement … one of my records for this year’s “Critics’ Choice”’ Gramophone

‘Maazel draws characteristically brilliant playing from the Cleveland Orchestra … a conclusion relentless in its power … superb playing and powerfully brilliant recording.’ (Prokofiev) Gramophone

‘Not only is it superbly recorded, but also the Clevelanders provide the kind of lean and mean execution that Prokofiev’s epic yet thorny writing cries out for. High strings, low brass and percussion, all play with a precision and clarity that comes across as simply audacious. Maazel’s conducting of the symphony begins ordinarliy enough, but about seven minutes into the first movement the energy builds and never relaxes until the very end of the Finale. As a bonus, you’ll never hear the complicated percussion writing in the finale’s coda section played so alertly as it is here.’ (Prokofiev) ClassicsToday