Schubert: Symphonies 3, 4, 5, 6, 8; Rosamunde
Eduard van Beinum
Label
Decca
Catalogue No.
4825521
Barcode
00028948255214
Format
2-CD
About
TRACK LISTING / ARTISTS

FRANZ SCHUBERT
CD 1
Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D.417 ‘Tragic’*
Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, D.485*
Rosamunde, D.797 – Incidental music (excerpts)*

CD 2
Symphony No. 3 in D major, D.200
Symphony No. 6 in C major, D.589 ‘The Little’
Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D.759 ‘Unfinished’

Concertgebouworkest
Eduard van Beinum

*FIRST CD RELEASE ON DECCA

Recording information

Recording Producers: John Culshaw (Symphony No. 4, Rosamunde); Victor Olof (Symphony No. 5); Jaap van Ginneken (Symphonies Nos. 3, 6, 8)
Balance Engineers: Kenneth Wilkinson (Symphony No. 4, Symphony No. 5, Rosamunde); Henk Jansen, Hans Lauterslager, Cees Huizinga (Symphony No. 3); Henk Jansen, Cees Huizinga (Symphonies Nos. 6, 8)
Recording Location: Grote Zaal, Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 17 September 1946 (Symphony No. 5), May 1952 (Rosamunde), November–December 1952 (Symphony No. 4), 6–9 June 1955 (Symphony No. 3), 22–25 May 1957 (Symphony Nos. 6, 8)
Original LP Releases: Decca LX 3082 (Symphony No. 5); LXT 2779 (Symphony No. 4); Decca LXT 2770 (Rosamunde); Philips A00294/5L (Symphony No. 3); Philips A00442L (Symphony Nos. 6, 8)

Reviews

‘The performance is an entirely exhilarating one… a very fine version of the Symphony indeed.’ (No.3) Gramophone, March 1956

‘I enjoyed this very much. And that is something to say of yet another new recording of the ‘Unfinished’. Van Beinum is a conductor of whom I don’t normally expect some blinding new revelation but I do always expect from him a thoroughly musical interpretation, faithful to the score and, at the same time, sensitive; and that is what he gives us here.’ (No.8) Gramophone, August 1958

‘Not only is there brio and dash aplenty, there is a daring that other conductors would do well to follow. Van Beinum, for example, has the good sense to ignore Schubert’s moderato specification for the finale of the Sixth Symphony, arid at the conductor’s uncommonly brisk tempo, this often tedious-sounding music becomes transformed into something refreshingly animated … Indeed, the “Unfinished“ offers a blend of soaring lyricism and searing intensity that one rarely encounters and that purges the work of even the slightest hint of sentimentality.’ Fanfare, May/June 1979