Coates, Elgar, Coward: Orchestral Music
Eric Coates; Geoffrey Corbett; Malcolm Sargent
Label
Decca
Catalogue No.
4840190
Barcode
00028948401901
Format
2-CD
About
TRACK LISTING / ARTISTS

CD 1
ERIC COATES (1881–1957)
The Three Elizabeths – Suite
Four Centuries – Suite
The Three Bears – A Phantasy
The Dance of the Orange Blossoms (The Jester at the Wedding)
The Three Men – Suite
New Symphony Orchestra of London
Eric Coates

CD 2
ALBERT COATES
Suite from the Dramatic Music of Henry Purcell

SIR EDWARD ELGAR (1857–1934)
Variations on an Original Theme, Op. 36 ‘Enigma’
London Symphony Orchestra
Sir Malcolm Sargent

SIR NOËL COWARD (1899–1973)
London Morning
Orchestrated by Gordon Jacob
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Geoffrey Corbett

FIRST CD RELEASE ON DECCA

Recording information

Recording Producers: unknown (Eric Coates); John Culshaw (Albert Coates, Elgar); Michael Bremner (Coward)
Balance Engineers: unknown (Eric Coates); Kenneth Wilkinson (Albert Coates, Elgar); Arthur Bannister (Coward)
Recording Locations: Kingsway Hall, London, UK, 3 May 1949 (Eric Coates: The Three Bears, Dance of the Orange Blossoms, The Three Men), 5–7 January 1953 (Albert Coates, Elgar); Decca Studios, West Hampstead, London, UK, 3–4 February 1953 (Eric Coates: The Three Elizabeths, Four Centuries); Decca Studio 1, West Hampstead, London, UK, 1959 (Coward)
Original Decca Releases: LM 4505 (Eric Coates: The Three Bears, Dance of the Orange Blossoms, The Three Men): June 1950; LK 4056: (Eric Coates: The Three Elizabeths, Four Centuries): May 1953; LXT 2786 (Albert Coates, Elgar): May 1953; LW 5354 (Coward): September 1959

Reviews

“Another suite of excellent musical journalism, recorded with all appropriate point and vigour … Blessings on deft providers of such things!” Gramophone, October 1950 (The Three Men)

“It all sounds disarmingly simple … yet no other contemporary composer, except possibly Leroy Anderson, seems to have mastered the secret … The performance under the composer’s direction may be taken to be definitive.” High Fidelity, September 1953 (The Three Elizabeths)

“A most satisfying performance … More excellent sound from Decca: the Coronation seems to have made quite a difference – richer, riper, more resonant.” High Fidelity, September 1953 (Enigma Variations)

“Sir Malcolm secures a performance that is both careful and enthusiastic; the tempi are sensible, the solos are beautifully played, and the recording is well managed.” The Record Guide, 1955 (Enigma Variations)

“Full of interest from beginning to end. Playing and recording are both excellent.” Gramophone, November 1959 (London Morning)